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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
're seeing most of the growth in large cities. >> what about this gift from random house to all of its employees. pretty nice. >> yes, call it 50 shades of green, if you will. random house, which is the publisher of "50 shades of grey," the lascivious adult novel that's been all the rage this year, the company has seen major uptick in large part because of the book and soars. the ceo announced this week at the holiday party that every one of the employees will get a $5,000 bonus this year. that's really great news especially in the world of publishing, which has been sort of on a downward death spiral. >> that's really nice for them. well, great. thank you very much. morgan brennan. >> in today's one-minute play back. governor chris christie on "the daily show" the universal telethon for hurricane sandy victims and about meeting the boss bruce springsteen back stage. >> he came up, put his hands down. shook his hand. i tried to be cool. i wasn't. then he said, come on, give me a hug. i said, all right. i hugged him. >> did he go, come on, stop. >> no. you know, that's always hard to ju
ranked among the worst in the nation, even though the district was spending more per pupil than large u.s. cities, almost $13,000 per student. but in 2009, washington, d.c. became first in the nation to tie teacher salaries to student test scores under a program called "impact." teachers rated highly effective can get annual bonuses up to $25,000 if they stay at that achievement level for two straight years, they can also get a base salary increase of $20,000. a highly effective teacher can earn $76,000, the first year, and reach $131,000 in just nine years. less effective teachers earn 51,000 to start and are fired if they get poor involveses for two straight years. this year, 98 teachers were fired for poor performance. but nathan saunders, president of the washington teachers union, says the system is unfair to teachers when many of their student have barriers to learning, such as poverty. >> the penalties are so immediate and so painful, not just immediate in terms of their paycheck, but also immediate in terms of their careers. >> reporter: in washington, test scores are still amon
be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and you would have a full-fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that and the possibiliti
a largely black city, you saw folks going out to the suburbs. dollars going with them. that's the struggle. >> it's a struggle, but is the message at the end of your film hopeful or depressing? >> well, it's realistic. we're not saying that detroit is over, it can't rise again. we're saying please double down on detroit. please focus on a lot of us our cities going bankrupt and infrastructural problems in detroit. it's not a message of it's all going to be fine but if people ban together and we focus on places like detroit, of course, there's hope. >> you talk to so many people that are struggling. what did they say they want to get done and how do they expect it to get done? >> they want basic -- i think they want a basic quality of life. they really do. at this point it's donning on them that it's never going to be the way it used to be but they want to have a basic life and that their kids will have at least as good a life as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto indu
the next two years, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. that's exactly it. we want local entrepreneurs to take advantage of the faster seed that google fiber will bring and develop. you know, the sky is the limit. >> and how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. now we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment, for top talent to come, stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day, if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding an aunt ru pentrepreneu to take a risk and do that in your community is going to grow jobs and grow the economy. >> for now, dreams are driving wild on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas. >>
joins us in new york city. so what is going on here, jamie? >> reporter: there are large concerns and it is pretty serious why we're talking about it again. martha, it has been already five days and there is no sign of this 11-year-old cancer patient known only as emily but authorities haven't given up hope. they have actually expanded their search and making clear that time is not on their side. take a look at this. this is a snippet of surveillance video they're working with, showing emily inside the phoenix children's hospital where she has been treated for lukemia a day before her scheduled discharge. you see her without a wig and iv pole. her mom puts her in different clothes and disguise that allowed her to go undedected outside the hospital as police are describes an as black van. a alert nurse quickly contacted 911. the catheter in emily's heart, doctors say, if it becomes infected could have deadly consequences. the little girl had one arm amputated from a previous infection. >> i can tell you we have searched for these, location of these individuals, both locally and out
in an effort to restore balance. we are expecting large protests here today outside the palace here in cairo. in the city of alexandria, there have been more violent clashes between president morsei's opponents and his supporters. the president's opponents are demanding that he immediately gives up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago. they also want him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, due to take place in just over a week. critics say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president morsi didn't do either of those things last night. instead he offered to give up just one of his new powers, vaguely worded right to take all necessary measures to affect the country. he said he would give up the other powers once the referendum had taken place. also yesterday, president obama telephoned president morsi to express his deep concern over the violence and deaths that have occurred. he also urged president morsi to have a dialogue with the opposition without any preconditions. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo
economy is putting more large trucks on the road or maybe because of all the bike lanes in new york city and people are angry and trying to hit them. can't confirm that. >>> triple a reports the average annual price of gas this year will almost certainly top last year's record. well, despite that, prices are falling now and in a big way. the lund berg survey shows the average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded is down 10 cents over the past three weeks and i continuing down. what's causing this, rich? >> reporter: americans are driving less. that and slowing economic growth mean the world is using less oil. after problems earlier this year, refineries are pumping out more gas. also, warmer than average temperatures meaning americans are using less oil to heat their homes. all that pushes prices down further. prices also spiked after hurricane sandy and have fallen since, shepard. >> shepard: so right now they're headed down more, right? > >> reporter: that's right. there's a difference between lowest and highest of 80 cents a gallon. 3.85 in long island, in mems me, tennessee, it's les
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
the army and were recently able to overtake the city of goma despite a large u.n. security presence there. the house armed services committee hosts this hearing. this is three hours. i can't help but reflect on the millions of innocent people around the world who are caught in fundamentally unjust and socially complex situations. these situations can make anyone's heart break and naturally leads one to consider the simple question what can be done. one thing it sure makes me appreciate our country. i have heard that less than 2% of the people that have ever lived here on the earth have lived under the kind of freedoms that we enjoy. we are so blessed. and when we see how innocent lives are -- how people are hurt so much by some of the thing that is are happening around the world, it just again really makes me appreciate home. the question and likewise the answer becomes more complex as we contemplate what can be done within the context of u.s. national security interest constrained budgets ongoing commitments around the globe and potential future contingencies that the military has to be
-presidential protesters in tahrir square. in other parts of the city, about two miles from here, as many as 200,000 protesters turned out. these are people who support president morsi. many of them from the muslim brotherhood. a large number were bussed in from rural areas in egypt. many carrying the koran and shouting, god is the law. it was a real show of force and show of public support by those who support egypt's new president. he also announced there will be a constitutional referendum on december 15. it came really after a vote on friday pushing through that constitution in one day. now the nation will have the chance to vote up or down on that constitution. president morsi said the extreme powers he declared for himself last week would end when that constitution is ratified. perhaps in just two weeks' time. it's not clear that's going to be enough for the protesters behind me, some of whom intend to sleep on the square until they drive president morsi from power. rick, back to you. >> rick: steve streaming live from cairo. thanks. >> arthel: closer to home, our neighbor to the south swe
as a replacement. >>> they ignored warnings that a large hurricane could hit the big apple. a 2,006 report said it was a question of time before hurricane came and flooded the system and caused wide outages in new york city. those warnings went unheeded due to concerns about budget cuts and the likelihood of such a storm. hurricane sandy is the second costliest disaster in u.s. history. >>> they had the first hack-a-thon. they worked on ideas yesterday afternoon. the goal was to create fun and practical apps using public information available through county records. >> we have seen interesting ideas around restaurant inspections. and we have seen ideas around places like parks. parks and rec information was interesting to people. >>> the grand prize winners made an app called book it and they took home a $3,000 prize. >>> there appears to and growing backlash against the new logo for the university of california system. more than 25,000 people have signed an on line petition at change.org to review the new design which made its debut friday. some say it is undignified. the new design is not rep
. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> we are getting pictures in here from michigan and show you and tell you what's happening there. there are large protests, basically closing down the state capitol building here. this is lansingmy, michigan. eight people arrested. there are a couple thousand people protesting inside the building. a number of them outside the capitol building. police, they say they're not letting anyone else inside. 50 state troopers are there on the ground. protests are over a push by the governor of michigan, rick snyder to make michigan a right to work state. letting workers in michigan decide whether or not they want to join unions. so the capitol is scheduled to close in just about two and a half hours from now. so police say anyone who refuses to leave will be arrested and will be charged with trespa trespassing. >>> i want to talk about this, though. one of the biggest companies, the biggest companies without a doubt in the world moving jobs out of china. bringing them back to america. apple c eo tim cook with this announcement. >>
areas, that he's surrounded by a large contingent of loyal fighters. but that narrative is pre- 9/11 understanding of ubl. the second narrative, he's living in the city, living in a city with multiple points of egress and entry, access to communications, so that he can keep in touch with the organization. you can't run a global network of interconnected cells from a cave. >> that was a clip of the new movie called "zero dark thirty," chronicles this mission highlighting many of the people in the takedown including this young woman in seeking, finding, killing osama bin laden. in this new report from "the washington post," this mystery cia operative has a very complicated life, even more so after the bin laden raid. joining me from washington is greg miller, the intelligence reporter with the post, with "the washington post." welcome. >> thanks. >> what an article. i read it and from what i can tell, and also listen to an interview with catherine bigelow. this cia operative found the link to the courier to drive this forward to find osama bin laden. who is she? what do you know? >>
of hartford. 60 miles outside of new york city. a decent sized town, population about 27,000. but the school district itself has about 5400 kids. it's a pretty large district. this school in particular, kindergarten through fourth grade as the wnyw helicopter moves closer to that town. alisyn: it's sandy hook elementary school. about that town it's a very, very pretty town. it has a lot of beautiful town squares, churches on corners with pretty old steeples. parts of it are historic. it shows that this sort of terror parents experience everywhere, sadly. this story happens everywhere and you can just imagine how parents are feeling as they are getting this news that something apparently has happened at this school today, and there were gunshots, and that someone is hurt, but beyond that it is hard to know if all the students are okay. we wish we could report that, but at this hour we don't have that information. bill: crime is very few to this town, very low. one violent criminal offense in 2010 is are being reported in newtown, connecticut. okay, we're working through this. we'll be on the
and about box and the point i was trying to stress is i think the u.s. writ large, the government and also the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there
washington city, there was competition. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly awe inspiring. in fact, a diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor awe inspiring but the answer that the congressman gave was the building served it purpose. if it was larger praps more president would be declined to become its permen innocent resident. -- permanent dez represent. >> the president's home and photographs and history. watch sunday evening on c-span 3's american history tv. >> the mayor of new jersey went before congress today along with the new york's small business director and the long island small business president. this is about an hour and a half. >> we want to discussion the small business administration response to hurricane sandy. the president's recent supplemental request in this space and state and local small business recovers in the impacted region. i would like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment and i will introduce them in just a moment. but let me make a couple of brief opening statements. we're here today to evaluate
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)